Youmans (pronounced like 'yeoman' with an 's' added)
is the best-kept secret among contemporary American writers.
--John Wilson, editor, Books and Culture

Monday, September 04, 2006

The Palace Aphorisms, series 1, no. 2

Bored?

Idle?

Too dratted lazy to read a good book?

If so, my frivolous, time-frittering friend, take a look at http://www.balloonhat.com/ for The Varieties of the Balloonhat Experience, something that may sound like William James but is not. See people from 34 countries around the world in balloon hats, the weird enterprise of Addi Somekh and Charlie Eckert, who must be wacky, wonderfully wacky.

Okay, now that that's out the way, here's the 2nd aphorism from the Tourists & Fat People series:

Inside a very fat tourist is a slim young man who longs to be a vagabond and a wastrel.

Hop one post down for the first aphorism, etc.; skip three down for more information about the Palace Aphorisms.

11 comments:

  1. Inside a very fat tourist is someone who wonders why the heck he ever agreed to go on this trip, so far away from fridge and flat screen tv, in the first place.

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  2. Have you been hanging out in Cooperstown? That's how many of them sound, complaining on their cell phones. I went downtown today; the number of tourists of all sizes was somewhat diminished.

    So delightful! The consolation of fall (I like fall, but then comes Yankee winter.)

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  3. That was not anonymous, and I said so, too. And again, now, drat it all.

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  4. A little dissociative personality disorder never hurt anyone.

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  5. Ms. Laura,

    I was of two minds about your interesting DPD maxim, but now I have decided that they both agree.

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  6. The chances a fat tourist would walk down to Doubleday Field to catch Bob Dylan perform "Ballad of a Thin Man" are slim to none.

    Are you going, M? I hear Zimmy will be there tomorrow (9/2) ... how odd. Sue and I saw him and Joni Mitchell a few years ago at Georgia Tech. It was Joni's birthday and we all sang to her. Quite a moment.

    The novel progresses slowly, steadily, characters doing things I hadn't intended -- interesting, but unexpected. Even Dylan makes a fleeting appearance, if only aurally (is that possible in a book?).

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  7. Hi Jim--

    Excellent maxim! I was at Doubleday today, because my dryer died. So I hung out at the wee little hole of a laundromat there.

    No, not me, though I'll be able to hear from my house--as in your novel. And tomorrow I'm doing a signing in the Catskills, if I don't get lost. Right now I must go dig up some spare out-of-print books that I promised to bring.

    I'll visit 'your place' next week and see what else you have to say about that novel...

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  8. Hi Marly,

    Glad your back. I am still wresting with blogger and pictures. I LOVE my Mac, but blogger doesn't seem to like it.

    Ah well.

    And I send you some late summer sun and weather from NC.

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  9. Drat, the weather didn't arrive! Lots of tree-tossing wind and rain and gloom. Fall is definitely here.

    "AUTUMN is over the long leaves that love us,
    And over the mice in the barley sheaves;
    Yellow the leaves of the rowan above us,
    And yellow the wet wild-strawberry leaves."

    The consolation of Yeats...

    Bug blogger until it works. That's all you can do.

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  10. Yup, very true - you can see the slim vagabond peering out wondering how he ended up in there.

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  11. How claustrophobic... I feel a diet coming on.

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Alas, I must once again remind large numbers of Chinese salesmen and other worldwide peddlers that if they fall into the Gulf of Spam, they will be eaten by roaming Balrogs. The rest of you, lovers of grace, poetry, and horses (nod to Yeats--you do not have to be fond of horses), feel free to leave fascinating missives and curious arguments.