Youmans (pronounced like 'yeoman' with an 's' added) is the best-kept secret
among contemporary American writers. --John Wilson, editor, Books and Culture Marly Youmans is a novelist and poet out of sync with the times
but in tune with the ages. --First Things

Wednesday, December 31, 2014

At Life and Legends

Issue two
Thank you to poet Jennifer Reeser for soliciting poems for Life and Legends. As I am a wee bit lazy about sending out, it is helpful to be asked. Here is a link to my poems in the issue, and a glimpse of the start of each:

Sangréal

Bird the color of rose,
  Sanguinary dove,

and

The Rain Doves at Birkenau

The little white house in a field,
The little red house in a field,

and

Something Like a Memory

You’re there, white tinged with blue like watered milk.
The ink seed planted in your brain in life

***

Not the Graham Ward piece I was dreaming
about, but it has much the same spirit,
suggestive of Eucharist and Sangréal. 
It's barely up, and a few things need to be tweaked by the tech mavens... The stanza lines in the first poem are not indented properly (should be staggered), and the last poem does have a title, so those things will be corrected. The photograph of me is by Paul Digby.

***

Notes, if you are so inclined:

The Rain Doves at Birkenau
Wikipedia, "Auschwitz concentration camp": The first gas chamber at Birkenau was the "red house" (called Bunker 1 by SS staff), a brick cottage converted into a gassing facility by tearing out the inside and bricking up the walls. It was operational by March 1942. A second brick cottage, the "white house" or Bunker 2, was converted some weeks later. These structures were in use for mass killings until early 1943.

Sangréal
The holy grail.
Here and here are some pieces about Graham Ward by Clive Hicks-Jenkins.

And you know, it's getting quite cold enough for this chilly poem, turned into a video by Paul Digby... Here's a belated addition to the post:

3 comments:

  1. Your understandable concerns about the typography and layout remind me of our ongoing editorial problems with Emily Dickinson's poems. Just imagine how our reading might be improved and made more faithful to the originals if she had been alive to oversee the printing of her poems. So, to my mind, it seems as though you are in good company. Have a happy day.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hmm, Paul Tree told me he couldn't post. If anybody else is having a problem, please leave me a message at Facebook (it's set on public) or drop me an email.

    ReplyDelete

Alas, I must once again remind large numbers of Chinese salesmen and other worldwide peddlers that if they fall into the Gulf of Spam, they will be eaten by roaming Balrogs. The rest of you, lovers of grace, poetry, and horses (nod to Yeats--you do not have to be fond of horses), feel free to leave fascinating missives and curious arguments.