Youmans (pronounced like 'yeoman' with an 's' added) is the best-kept secret among contemporary American writers.--John Wilson, editor, Books and Culture.

Monday, October 29, 2012

Wuthering

A vignette for Thaliad.
By Welsh artist Clive Hicks-Jenkins.
Another mad day as I try to cram Tuesday's events and appointments into Monday. Something is coming this way.... The trees are tossing, and the sky is thick, gray lint. The winds are still whirling and haven't decided on a dominant direction but have started to whistle and moan from time to time. As the still-recent hurricane-and-tropical-storm (Irene, followed by the tree-slaughtering Lee) dropped trees on both our cars, we have learned a lesson and popped the little one into the garage, but the new truck will have to stand firm in front of the house, and I hope the trees across the street will do likewise. School is set for dismissal at 1:00, but I won't be surprised if the buses fire up a little earlier.

As soon as I navigate what I can of the Monday-plus-Tuesday schedule, I need to read, read, read. Let's hope the power and light holds this time around, as the cord of wood we wanted has not arrived, and I have much to do. We were one of the last four houses to have power in the village after Lee. I need to start proofing Thaliad a final time before it goes into print, just to make sure no errors of spacing or line breakage have been introduced.

6 comments:

  1. I hope the trees stay put, and your truck and cars remain in one piece. Take pictures. I want to see what that sky looks like.
    Is it windy there?

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  2. I hope it's not too devastating, though i hear it's going to be a big one...

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  3. Just want to echo the sentiments from above - hoping that the storm's not too damaging and disruptive. It can be terrifying when nature flares up.

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  4. Stay safe, warm and dry! I can't believe what I'm reading about this 'Frankenstorm'.

    And we had an earthquake Saturday evening on the coast north of us, and now lots of talk about preparedness or lack of it.

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  5. Robbi,

    I just got home, and the sky is now invisible. The winds may have blown it away.

    I went out to do as much of my Monday-Tuesday errands as possible, but now I am glad to be inside as the winds have kicked up several notches and the rain is harder.

    My regret is how little wood we have in case we have no power later. Tried to get some of Friday... And today... No luck so far.

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  6. Juliet,

    Thanks!

    & also to Lynn--

    and Marja-Leena, I suppose that a shock (I did see it was 7.7) wakes one up to the nature of Mother Nature...

    Fran (when I lived in Chapel Hill-Carrboro) was my biggest hurricane experience as an adult, but I was so tired (children, children!) that I slept through much of the hurricane and woke up to the trees like pick-up sticks everywhere. We had more personal damage from tropical storm Lee last year, with the giant Kentucky coffee tree landing on our cars.

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Alas, I must once again remind large numbers of Chinese salesmen and other worldwide peddlers that if they fall into the Gulf of Spam, they will be eaten by roaming Balrogs. The rest of you, lovers of grace, poetry, and horses (nod to Yeats--you do not have to be fond of horses), feel free to leave fascinating missives and curious arguments.