Youmans (pronounced like 'yeoman' with an 's' added) is the best-kept secret
among contemporary American writers. --John Wilson, editor, Books and Culture Marly Youmans is a novelist and poet out of sync with the times
but in tune with the ages. --First Things

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Yolanda Sharpe, new watercolors--

Peach Confections, 26" x 40"

Last week I enjoyed a visit to Yolanda Sharpe's house and SUNY to see artwork currently underway. Here's a peek at some new watercolors, not yet flattened and mounted. It is intriguing to see how her large pen and ink and encaustic works appear superficially very different from these, yet show innumerable connections through boldness of execution, color, shapes, and composition. You can take a look at her wonderfully varied work at yolandasharpe.com.

Big Purple II, 26" x 40"


Blue, Red, and Yellow, 26" x 40"

11 comments:

  1. Yolanda's work is vibrant and exciting in so many ways. Extremely refreshing stuff.
    I went to Yolanda's web page and this vibrancy is there in the encaustic work and the ink work too. I think vibrancy is a signature of hers!

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    1. Yes, that's a good word for all three modes--and actually for her older work in oils on shaped canvases as well.

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  2. Oh yes, vibrancy indeed! I love the size she is working in too, must look stunning on the walls.

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    1. And she has done a recent-ish watercolor piece that was 3 sheets laid together as triptych...

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  3. I am envious (sinful, isn't it?) about folks with artistic talent. Once upon a time, when I was younger than I knew, I was touted has having artistic talent; I even had my ticket punched for an art scholarship, but my parents reasoned that a teaching degree would put more food on the table ( . . . they did not know about the word "adjunct"). However, for so many reasons, I abandoned the pursuit of visual arts, and now -- for so many reasons -- I would have trouble doing a sketch of a cylinder ( . . . art students remember that exercise). So, friends, artistic talent is not like riding a bicycle. It does not remain without being nurtured. Thus, I am sinfully envious of Yolanda and all others who create sublime visual delights. Now, for the hell of it, I think I will find a cylinder to use as a model. Let the sketching begin!

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    1. Postscript: I wonder, except in the case of genius-savants, are there any folks with talents who can sustain their talent without practice, practice, and (more) practice?

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    2. Sketch every day, and you would get better fast!

      Well, there can't be any because after a while the skills we learn in what we call practice is in great part replaced by simply doing the work, isn't it? And if somebody doesn't do the work, pretty soon he's not a painter or writer or whatever it is but something else.

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  4. Lovely, amazing work by a very talented artist! I am awed by her skill and the delicacy of her touch.

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    1. Thanks, Robin--lovely compliment for her!

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  5. Thank you all for checking out my watercolors on Marly's blog. I truly appreciate the time taken to look and comment on what you saw.

    Yolanda

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    1. Hi Yolanda--some great responses here and elsewhere...

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Alas, I must once again remind large numbers of Chinese salesmen and other worldwide peddlers that if they fall into the Gulf of Spam, they will be eaten by roaming Balrogs. The rest of you, lovers of grace, poetry, and horses (nod to Yeats--you do not have to be fond of horses), feel free to leave fascinating missives and curious arguments.