Youmans (pronounced like 'yeoman' with an 's' added) is the best-kept secret
among contemporary American writers. --John Wilson, editor, Books and Culture Marly Youmans is a novelist and poet out of sync with the times
but in tune with the ages. --First Things

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

Bright Hill frolics


The day after my (gigantic) birthday and conflagration of candles, I'm going off to the Bright Hill Center in Treadwell, New York to meet writers and readers and read for a few minutes in celebration of the center:
Twenty-one years of readings, workshops, art exhibits and more will be celebrated Saturday as Bright Hill Center marks its anniversary with an open house and marathon reading. 
From 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. [on November 23rd], the Treadwell arts venue will invite many of those who have been involved with Bright Hill during its 21-year history to join in the celebration. Refreshments will be served throughout the day, with “anniversary cake” served at 6 p.m. during a closing reception. Works from Bright Hill’s archives dating back to 1992 will be on display... 
Scheduled to participate, along with founder Bertha Rogers, are Evelyn Augusto of Jefferson, Mermer Blakeslee of Roscoe, Richard Bernstein of Norwich, Richard Q. Downey of Otego, Ernest M. Fishman of Treadwell, Jesse Hilson of Delhi, Ginnah Howard of Gilbertsville, Sylvia Jorrin of East Meredith, Susan King of Walton, Tommy Klehr of Oneonta, Andy Morris of Downsville, John O’Connor of Franklin and New York City, Sharon Ruetenik of Delhi, Annie Sauter of Oneonta, Pamela Strother of Oneonta, Julia Suarez of Oneonta and Marly Youmans of Cooperstown.
For more information about the celebration, go here. (Yes, there will be much cake!) I'll be reading in their Word Thursdays series next year.

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Alas, I must once again remind large numbers of Chinese salesmen and other worldwide peddlers that if they fall into the Gulf of Spam, they will be eaten by roaming Balrogs. The rest of you, lovers of grace, poetry, and horses (nod to Yeats--you do not have to be fond of horses), feel free to leave fascinating missives and curious arguments.