Youmans (pronounced like 'yeoman' with an 's' added)
is the best-kept secret among contemporary American writers.
--John Wilson, editor, Books and Culture

Tuesday, February 05, 2013

Marly goes Lightspeed

Prolegomenon to the Adventures of Childe Phoenix by Marly Youmans (illustrated by Galen Dara)The story is illustrated by Galen Dara.


Read at Lightspeed
"Prolegomenon to the Adventures of Childe Phoenix" (short story) is up at Lightspeed. Many thanks to writers and publishers Gavin Grant and Kelly Link for its original print publication in Lady Churchill's Rosebud Wristlet (2007), and to Lightspeed editor John Joseph Adams for asking to reprint the story. (John Crowley also has a reprint in this issue.) I am glad to find that even the stranger dictates of the heart may find a welcome out in the world.

Listen at Lightspeed
Paul Boehmer's reading of "Prologomenon to the Adventures of Childe Phoenix" is also available for download (time 38+ minutes.)

Read more: Author Spotlight
Christie Yant interviews me, asking questions about the story in the areas of response, family secrets, poetry vs. prose, theme, and upcoming publications.

Later: Oops. I suppose that I should have noted that a place for leaving comments is at the very foot of each Lightspeed page... Enjoy!

3 comments:

  1. Your short story is magical, a little terrifying and otherworldly like the ancient folk tales gathered by the Grimms and others, before they were sanitized for child audiences and by Disney. Love the interview too, Marly.

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  2. I think my comment got lost! I just wanted to say how much I enjoyed your short story. It made me think of the ancient tales such as those collected by the Grimms before they were sanitized for children or prettified by Disney. Loved the interview too, Marly!

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  3. Hey, Marja-Leena-- Glad you enjoyed it--and any time you use the word "ancient," I can feel the compliment!, since you are a lover of all things ancient! XD

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Alas, I must once again remind large numbers of Chinese salesmen and other worldwide peddlers that if they fall into the Gulf of Spam, they will be eaten by roaming Balrogs. The rest of you, lovers of grace, poetry, and horses (nod to Yeats--you do not have to be fond of horses), feel free to leave fascinating missives and curious arguments.