Youmans (pronounced like 'yeoman' with an 's' added) is the best-kept secret among contemporary American writers.--John Wilson, editor, Books and Culture.

Saturday, September 08, 2012

Red King Redux




Three of The Book of the Red King poems are at the 2012-2 issue of David Landrum's Lucid Rhythms: "The Fool, the King, and the Fox-Fall," "The Yellow Fool," and "The Red Fool." The latter two are little poems based on alchemical colors (some others of these have appeared in At Length), and the first is a narrative. I need to think more about the first one, whether it will stay as is, whether it will go in the final version of the sequence--in the book, that is.

And I hereby nominate the Red King for President. In accordance with tradition, the Fool will play veep. Both promise not to bombard you with bombast, make promises, zap email, send mail, or commit any other botheration. In return: governance rising to perfection through alchemical stages. And perfect Fooldom.

4 comments:

  1. I absolutely love 'The Book of the Red King' poetry, so it is good to read more of them in 'Lucid Rhythms' ('Rythms' on the page?)
    Each of these poems is so distinct in movement, pace, and feel - and yet they belong to one another wonderfully, Marly.

    These are always a treat!

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  2. Yep, I noticed that typo and told the editor... guess the webmaster will get around to it.

    I am hoping to have some time to work on the ones that have never been sent out this fall. It's just such a huge series.

    Thanks, Paul!

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  3. I think the Red King poetry is some of your most magical, Marly.
    Pure GLEE!
    Plus.

    Can't wait for it to all hit the world!
    ("Take THIS, World!")

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  4. It will be a while... It's pretty unwieldy. Shall cut some, shall revise more. I'll get there eventually.

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Alas, I must once again remind large numbers of Chinese salesmen and other worldwide peddlers that if they fall into the Gulf of Spam, they will be eaten by roaming Balrogs. The rest of you, lovers of grace, poetry, and horses (nod to Yeats--you do not have to be fond of horses), feel free to leave fascinating missives and curious arguments.