Youmans (pronounced like 'yeoman' with an 's' added)
is the best-kept secret among contemporary American writers.
--John Wilson, editor, Books and Culture

Sunday, June 17, 2012

Thaliad dreaming...


Yesterday I received a batch of drawings in the mail from Clive Hicks-Jenkins, cover dreams for the upcoming Thaliad, an epic poem from Phoenicia Publishing in Montreal that will follow the publication of The Foliate Head (UK: Stanza Press) this fall. I feel quite lucky to have gotten to play with such interesting artists, and especially with Clive, who is a regular art-partner of mine. We each understand great precincts of the other rather well, and that is satisfying.

When an artist contributes pieces to a book of poetry, the poet is especially grateful because, as is well known in our time, poetry no longer "pays" except in a token way (except when poets are famous in another realm) and so requires the artist make a gift that is mainly one of love. Clive is especially drawn to books and words and served in the theatre for many years as dancer, choreographer, set designer, director, and more. Last night he posted another Thaliad sketch and a scattering of cut-out leaves and birds on his Artlog...

5 comments:

  1. Strong image with shades of Matisse. And it looks like a good pairing for a poet's words.

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  2. It's lovely, and you are lucky indeed to have inspired Clive's gift of love in return for yours.

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  3. Ruth,

    There will be a sort of portrait on the cover, too. A foliate woman...

    Robbi,

    I am every inch of grateful!

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  4. Another fabulous artistic and poetic collaboration, how lucky you are with your friends!

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  5. Think it would be fun to do something like a broadside with each of my artists friends...

    Yes, I am lucky! Bit tired after Father's Day out of town. Yawn. Shall see what you're up to tomorrow.

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Alas, I must once again remind large numbers of Chinese salesmen and other worldwide peddlers that if they fall into the Gulf of Spam, they will be eaten by roaming Balrogs. The rest of you, lovers of grace, poetry, and horses (nod to Yeats--you do not have to be fond of horses), feel free to leave fascinating missives and curious arguments.