Youmans (pronounced like 'yeoman' with an 's' added) is the best-kept secret among contemporary American writers.--John Wilson, editor, Books and Culture.

Saturday, September 10, 2011

Oldish book, brand new review--



I love getting a review for a book that came out years before--it's encouraging to think that a book may be temporarily out of print yet still find its intended readers.  Here are a few clips from a new review.  Thank you, Black Cat Lit!
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Set in the Blue Ridge Mountains of western North Carolina, The Curse of the Raven Mocker is a complex story inspired by the legends of the Cherokee and the culture of the region’s European settlers. Richly detailed and imagined, it’s a uniquely American fantasy...
I enjoyed this book because of its uniqueness in creating a fantasy world inspired by American myths. It was refreshing to read a fantasy that isn’t based on European myth... This may be the classic “child on a quest” storyline, but the beautiful descriptions of the landscape, imagery, and the language make this one different...
The Curse of the Raven Mocker is a must read due to its roots in Appalachian and Cherokee myth and the great characters Youmans has created. It’s clear that love went into the writing of this novel. It deserves to be a classic.

8 comments:

  1. 5 out of 5 has never seemed inadequate before.

    A classic is a classic.
    Expect (and demand from the universe) more.

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  2. Happy to hear people are reviewing your books, which might lead to attention and republication of any that have gone out of print.

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  3. Yes, well, reviews normally come in the three-month window after publications, so it's always pleasant to see one years after.

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  4. Wow, what an awesome review! Congrats!

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  5. Shall have to stick a bit on the book page with my others...

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  6. You're very welcome and thanks for writing such a wonderful book! I ordered Ingledove a few days ago and look forward to reading it.

    I grew up in western North Carolina, so it was great to read a fantasy set in the mountains and based on the local folklore. The mountains really do seem to be the home of magic sometimes.

    I do hope a lot more people read and review your work, because it deserves attention!

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  7. Thanks! I am glad you came by.

    I went to high school in Cullowhee, where people claimed to have seen the bones of the Little People... so it was a natural thing, I suppose.

    And thanks for the good wishes. I have a new book (poems) out and some others forthcoming, so I shall cross my fingers and toes.

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Alas, I must once again remind large numbers of Chinese salesmen and other worldwide peddlers that if they fall into the Gulf of Spam, they will be eaten by roaming Balrogs. The rest of you, lovers of grace, poetry, and horses (nod to Yeats--you do not have to be fond of horses), feel free to leave fascinating missives and curious arguments.