Youmans (pronounced like 'yeoman' with an 's' added)
is the best-kept secret among contemporary American writers.
--John Wilson, editor, Books and Culture

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Wales Album: roofs above Cardigan Bay

Gorse, Aberystwyth roofs and chimney pots, Cardigan Bay.

A glimpse of the roofline of The National Library of Wales,
where the Clive Hicks-Jenkins retrospective
in housed in The Gregynog Galley.

Aberystwyth roofs stepping down, down, down
to Cardigan Bay, with a view of the ring fort hill.

The ring fort again, and Cardigan Bay only a faint smudge.

11 comments:

  1. So much stone, and brick, and tile! Oh-so-green grass and big skies and the sea!

    This has to be Wales!
    Wonderfully caught, Marly!

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  2. It's that hill-fort again. Sometime I'm surprised that the fairies didn't steal you away to be their poet-under-the-hill. If they had I would have gone up there every day to whisper to you beneath the turf!

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  3. I think "gorse" is one of the funniest plant words/names. suppose I should look up its etymology.

    I like your "postcards"

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  4. Clive,

    I am nothing if not determined. Hill fort or bust!

    Did have my eye out for strange beings but saw none on my walk to the hill fort save a white horse and a brown horse on the path. And Dave Bonta, of course... ;-)

    zephyr,

    Thanks! Very surprising how many gorse variations there are. And sometimes they really take over a hill and look like a strange pelt.

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  5. Great. Now I'm pining. Again.

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  6. I would also love to go. I'm wishing I could go on a trip, but afraid to spend the money now.

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  7. It is a lot farther from Robbi to Wales than from Robin to Wales!

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  8. I've been working on the wings for years...nearly there.

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Alas, I must once again remind large numbers of Chinese salesmen and other worldwide peddlers that if they fall into the Gulf of Spam, they will be eaten by roaming Balrogs. The rest of you, lovers of grace, poetry, and horses (nod to Yeats--you do not have to be fond of horses), feel free to leave fascinating missives and curious arguments.