Youmans (pronounced like 'yeoman' with an 's' added) is the best-kept secret among contemporary American writers. --John Wilson, editor, Books and Culture

Saturday, July 22, 2006

This is Not a Post: New Books Alert!

No, I'm still taking a blog-sabbatical until after Labor Day. But I need to say that my friend Howard Bahr has sent me my very own copy of his brand new book, The Judas Field. Jump on the skateboard and fly down to your favorite independent and buy it! And if you hurry, you can be the very first soul to say a word about the novel on the Amazon River of book sale web sites. I met Howard via the horrid institution of The Blurb Request, but our penpaldom has brought me much pleasure, in and out of books.

In addition, another friend has a new nonfiction book that will be out at summer's close: In the Morning: Reflections from First Light, to be published in September by Mercer University Press. "This book of quiet essays is a very personal look at morning from many aspects—scientific, artistic, philosophical, and religious." I was supposed to meet Phil Williams at the Nashville Festival of the Book, but fate put his back out of joint. But we've been loyal penpals since then. Oddly enough, NFB is where I met Howard with his famous professor pal, Randy Cross.

Meanwhile, somebody I 'met' through magazine acceptances--the editor of Argosy Quarterly--has the first in a big fat series of young adult books coming soon: Apocatastasis, his livejournal blog, contains many of his pictures for Here, There Be Dragons. His plethora (and I mean plethora) of enterprises is featured on his Coppervale web site. You can even find Argosy there. I'm expecting that the dragons will bring him treasure and further issues of Argosy. That's James A. Owen, projector on a grand scale.

Oh, and be sure to go by Laurelines, where Laura Murphy Frankstone has moved on to the most delicious glass and silver and vegetable still lifes. Above is July 21st's watercolor, and you can even read what I said about Laura, Hawthorne, the Other, and the mysterious and infinite replication of artists--or something like that! Just don't take my story seed. Pilferage is mine!

And confetti and happy July 22nd birthday to B, my eldest! He's six-foot and seventeen, fresh home from Turkey and Greece.

17 comments:

  1. I'm not taking off my rose-colored leisure suit! No work until Labor Day!

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  2. Happy Birthday to the eldest son. I have a son who towers over me as well.

    I have posted an entry on my site about abstract art, please come and take a look. Also I have not recieved a book, I am concerned lest the post office ate it.

    --Donna

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  3. No, it is still sitting on the counter somewhere. Between visits from twin cousins and my mother, plus getting R off to a workshop and N off to D. C. and the Carolinas, this week has been rather lively.

    Have patience! Will do, I promise. (That'll teach you to be belated!)

    Just came home from Glimmerglass Opera. Tonight was "The Greater Good" (a world premiere), and so far it is--I've seen three so far, and this one is my favorite. The Rossini was well done, though.

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  4. 11:55 (Comment time is always wrong. It's a rule.)

    p. s.
    Drat! Forgot to say that I'll mosey over to your blog. But not today. I'm wiped out and still have a final midnight birthday event--the cutting of the requested watermelon...

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  5. Than you for popping in. :o)

    I am glad that you posted about this book. It looks like it will be intense.

    S

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  6. Miss Susanna of the hats (and weird rituals!):

    Since you wrote about being a student of Randy Cross, I know you mean The Judas Field. I read a piece of it earlier, but I shall get to the book itself soon--just as soon as I make a deadline...

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  7. Bless you for the metion and the link of my new book. I got the first copies last Friday and am very pleased with the look. Have a great week.

    --PLW

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  8. How nice to find a post--even a post that is not a post. And happy birthday to your eldest, who is just a year older (and a couple months) than my middle child.

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  9. Phil & jarvenpa--
    Thanks for pausing to look, even when this is not a post, and I am not here! Happy reading, glorious summering...

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  10. Hi Marly,

    This is just to say, I am sorry about being late and then getting lost in the traffic.

    Grandbaby life just got in the way when the promotion is going on. Grandbabies are now 19 and 1 month and wonderful by the way. Wish that Shelly would have kept posting to the other site, or here, and let us know about the little one.

    --Donna

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  11. marly-still-not-at-2, honest!12:19 PM, July 25, 2006

    All is forgiven by the person who will probably be late as well.

    Can't stay in the luxury of NCCAT forever, can we? If you root her up, ask her to post a picture on the seminar blog, or send one out to us... Have fun bouncing the bambinos.

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  12. A late public thank you, your Highness, for your continued support of my efforts. You're a wonderful friend.

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  13. 11:00 p.m. and just got home from listening to a friend's jazz trio at the Otesaga.

    The credit is all yours, for making something irresistible! And I was remembering that I have an old poem with lots of shadows on sliding glass doors... Glass. Shadows. Roots.

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  14. I'm putting on the rose-colored sweater and reading a book!

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  15. Ah, something to look forward to. And admirable restraint--not taking child time or writing time.

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  16. This summer my life-with-three-children has resembled an overstuffed wing chair--meant to be an easy chair, but afflicted with jolly but tiring explosions of energy and bouts of flight. Too many events, too much ferrying... I'm going to return to "normal" for a while, or so I fondly imagine.

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Alas, I must once again remind large numbers of Chinese salesmen and other worldwide peddlers that if they fall into the Gulf of Spam, they will be eaten by roaming Balrogs. The rest of you, lovers of grace, poetry, and horses (nod to Yeats--you do not have to be fond of horses), feel free to leave fascinating missives and curious arguments.