Youmans (pronounced like 'yeoman' with an 's' added) is the best-kept secret among contemporary American writers. --John Wilson, ed., Books and Culture. / New at patreon.

Wednesday, January 25, 2006

Blogs of more-than-passing Palace interest

Somehow I stumbled into a California bookseller-and-writer's blog that I liked very much--Jarvenpa's "outside the windows" (http://outsidethewindows.blogspot.com/). Now she has begun a brand new blog about her reading, and she has a wonderful piece about my Adantis books: http://jarvenpa.blogspot.com/2006/01/exceptional-marly-youmans-etc.html.

I did, indeed, love George MacDonald, although what I remember most from early childhood is At the Back of the North Wind and a paperback collection with a rainbow-winged bird on the cover. The title story was "The Golden Key," about Mossy and Tangle. At a little older age I found The Light Princess (and those wonderful Sendak illustrations) and then Phantastes and Lilith and the fat 2-volume Eerdman's collection, The Gifts of the Christ Child. I don't think that I read the Princess stories until I went to London for a month when I was barely 20.

Thank you, elusive Ms. Jarvenpa...

I'd also like to recommend a young girl's blog: http://www.imageofagoldenflower.blogspot.com/. It's new, but I happen to have great confidence in the writer.

2 comments:

  1. Glad you liked my comments about your superb books, Marly. I encountered the rest of MacDonald (beyond the Princess) much later in life too, but the Princess was read to me when I was 4, and soon thereafter I was reading it and rereading it on my own.
    It would have been amusing, and entirely proper, if you had commented at my site, saying something like "Damn right! I'm good!"

    ReplyDelete

Alas, I must once again remind large numbers of Chinese salesmen and other worldwide peddlers that if they fall into the Gulf of Spam, they will be eaten by roaming Balrogs. The rest of you, lovers of grace, poetry, and horses (nod to Yeats--you do not have to be fond of horses), feel free to leave fascinating missives and curious arguments.